Cedar City’s Significant Mormon Heritage Sites

After visiting the new Cedar City Temple, take a step back in time and tour Cedar City’s Significant Mormon Heritage Sites.

CEDAR CITY’S ROCK CHURCH

100 E CENTER STREET
The crown jewel of Cedar City’s downtown, built from donated materials and local labor during the Great Depression. This photogenic structure was built by Cedar City residents during the depression of the early 1930’s with all native materials and donated labor. Red cedar wood adorns the interior and benches in the Chapel while the colorful stones on the exterior were carefully matched. Free guided tours are given daily during the summer months.For a guided tour, please call Georgia Johnson at (702) 335-3412.

CEDAR CITY TABERNACLE MONUMENT

55 E CENTER STREET
The Cedar City Tabernacle was one of the most distinguished and loved buildings ever erected in Cedar City. It was located on the corner of Center and Main just west of where the Rock Church now stands. On November 2, 1877 the southwest cornerstone was laid. Almost all of the building was made from local materials, mostly donated, as was the labor. The lumber was brought from the co-op store sawmill in Deep creek. John Fretwell and John Dutton made 82,000 bricks, and the shingles were from Walker Brothers sawmill. It is said that every man in Cedar City donated
time or materials for the building. Every woman also sacrificed and helped.

CHAFFIN GRISTMILL MONUMENT

658 EAST 200 SOUTH (ALONG THE CANYON TRAIL)
This flourmill was constructed in the 1850’s and was operated by John D. Lee for several years. Then in 1866 after Lee had discontinued operating it, Louis L. Chaffin took over the mill. He remodeled it and he and his son Henry operated the mill for some time.

DAUGHTERS OF UTAH PIONEERS

581 NORTH MAIN STREET | FREE
Home to local experts and a beautiful collection of local pioneer artifacts, this museum is the perfect place to learn about Cedar City. Located in the Cedar City Visitor Center.

FIRST CEDAR ENCAMPMENT

1203 NORTH MAIN STREET
Iron ore having been discovered at Iron Springs, Brigham Young called missionaries to Iron County to make Iron. A militia of 35 men was organized in Parowan, Nov. 5, 1851, under Captain
Henry Lunt. Part of the company left Nov. 10th in 11 wagons and camped overnight in Summit Creek. Late in the afternoon of Nov. 11th, after driving in a snowstorm, they took refuge in the cove of this knoll. They set their wagon boxes on the ground in a line, protected them with brush enclosures, and began building a stockade. Within two weeks, the remainder of the company arrived.

FRONTIER HOMESTEAD STATE PARK

AN INTERACTIVE HISTORIC EXPERIENCE
A 250,000 pound ore shovel welcomes you to the Frontier Homestead, used in the early days of the iron mine, the shovel is ready for you to climb up and step back in time. Inside the museum is a world of stage coaches and wagons. Out back find hands-on activities on the “Homestead”, complete with historic structures representing life of an early pioneer settlement including the Hunter House, Deseret School House, Pioneer Cabin and Sheep Shearing Shed.

     IRON MISSION DAYS | NOVEMBER 11 | 10AM-3PM | $5 PER FAMILY
     From homemade treats to the Homestead’s famous hands-on activities, Iron Mission Days
     celebrates the beginnings of Cedar City. Spend time in the cool fall air as you enjoy
     pioneer activities, crafts for kids (including making rag dolls) and history demonstrations.

     CHRISTMAS AT THE HOMESTEAD | DECEMBER 4-8 | 5:30-8PM | $5 PER FAMILY
     Wandering musicians, twinkling lights, handcrafted Christmas trees, holiday crafts
     and homemade treats will give visitors a feeling of yesteryear. Find Santa and the
     elves in the Hunter House each evening. All the museum’s regular exhibits will be open each night.

     HOLIDAY MARKET | DEC 8, 11-8PM | DEC 9, 10-4PM| $1
     The market captures the sights, sounds and ambiance of a traditional pioneer bazaar;
     providing a truly unique holiday shopping experience.You can browse over 30 artists
     and craftsmen selling their holiday wares.

NELLIE UNTHANK MONUMENT

200 SOUTH 300 WEST
Located on the north side of 200 South in front of the Thorley Recital Hall on the Southern Utah University Campus. This monument was erected by the National Society of the Sons of Utah Pioneers in honor of Ellen (Nellie) Pucell Unthank as a representative example of the love, faith, courage, work, integrity and endurance of the many Mormon Pioneers. The monument shows a happy, vibrant 9-year-old Nellie, from England, as she started her trek west to the Salt Lake Valley with the Martin Handcart Company in 1856. The inscription on the monument tells some of her life story.

OLD IRON TOWN

20 MILES WEST OF CEDAR CITY VIA HIGHWAY 56 | FREE
Old Iron Town tells the incredible story of southern Utah’s historic mining industry. During the 1850’s, Mormon pioneer leader Brigham Young sent several families to the Cedar City area to establish an iron works. Iron City (Old Iron Town) was established as Iron County’s second attempt at mining iron; the establishment had a schoolhouse, blacksmith shop, a foundry and charcoal kiln. While Iron City seemed prosperous at the time, it only operated for seven years, closing due to the lack of sufficient transportation for the iron ore and the money panic of 1874.

OLD SOCIAL HALL MONUMENT

100 EAST, SOUTH OF CENTER STREET
The Cedar City Pioneers had made their homes in the Old Fort and had built an adobe schoolhouse 28 feet by 60 feet when, in May 1855, President Brigham Young advised them to move to higher ground. By 1859, the majority of the people had moved to the new Cedar City site and had a small, adobe room available for school, church and civic affairs. As more and more people occupied the new Cedar site, it became apparent that the small building was not adequate.

On January 6, 1861, a committee was appointed, composed of Samuel Leigh, John M. Higbee and Isaac C. Haight, who recommended building a social hall. With materials scarce and labor plentiful, the schoolhouse in the Old Fort was dismantled, brick by brick, and reassembled in the new location (Block 37 Lot 18) to become known as the “Social Hall.”